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PUBLISHED BY THE SENIORS OF 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 



Wilmington, Mass. 



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TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 

In Memoriam 18 

Dedication 19 

Administration 20 

Faculty 22 

Seniors 34 

Yearbook Staff 53 

Underclassmen 64 

Sports 72 

Activities 106 

Literary 109 




FOREWORD 



This is W.H.S. where we have con- 
tinued our search for knowledge for 
the past four years. We have left 
W.H.S. to continue our search in 
other parts of the world. 







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WE TREASURE BOTH THE 




Mrs. Webber, Senior Typing 






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Miss Farello, Student Council 



Miss Sharp, Senior Bookkeeping 



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THROUGH BETTER SPORTSMANSHIP. . . 








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VICTORY AND DEFEAT... JOYS... DISAPPOINTMENTS 



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In Memoriam to our classmate, William 
Emmons, we, the class of 1958, take pause 
to honor his memory. He was taken from us 
during our Freshman year and we shall 
always hold his memory in our hearts. 



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For helpful guidance, for her friendship, for 
understanding our problems, for constant in- 
spiration, we, the graduating class of 1958, 
respectfully dedicate this, our yearbook, to 
Miss Margaret M. Horner, advisor, teacher, 
friend. 






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Congratulations to you, the Graduates of 1958, on the successful completion of your high school 
studies. The opportunities which lie before you in this scientific age requires training and pre- 
paration beyond what you now possess. Let no goal pass unchallenged, and may you reach the ob- 
jectives you have set for your future! 

John J. Collins 
Superintendent of Schools 



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Your high school days are over and the serious 
side of life must now be faced. The teachings of 
your parents, church, and school should serve 
you well as you embark on your future career. 

You can not all be leaders in this life, but true 
also, you, and you alone, can determine whom 
you are going to follow. Remember well your 
teachings in democracy. First, you have duties 
as well as rights. Citizens too easily forget 
their obligations. Our government is based on 
the philosophy of all for one and one for all. 
Second, governmental issues must be determined 
on sound, logical reasoning based on the most 
good for the greatest number and not settled on 
the selfish motives of a select few. 

Whatever you do, don't become discouraged or 
lose faith. Keep striving for the best and enjoy 
your lives with a clear conscience. 

Best wishes for a long and happy life. 

Harold E. Driscoll 
Assistant Principal 



Congratulations upon the successful com- 
pletion of your high school education. Some have 
acquired all they possibly could, others have not 
used their full capacity. In either case, the real- 
ization of this is encouraging. 

Education, being an intangible thing, brings 
to mind the old Arabian Legend. Three men were 
crossing the desert and as they made camp one 
night, a genie spoke. "Empty your water bags 
and fill them with pebbles. When you break camp 
tomorrow at mid-day, inspect your waterbagsand 
you will be pleasantly surprised." The three 
men, being a little skeptical, emptied one water 
bag and half filled it with pebbles. At noon the 
following day, they opened the bag and saw that 
the pebbles had been changed to precious 
stones - diamonds, rubies, emeralds, etc. They 
all exclaimed "If we had only taken more!" 

Perhaps you, like the three men, now feel 
like saying "If we had only taken more!" In the 
case of education, fortunately, it is never too 
late - you may still take more. If you realize 
your short-comings and do something about it, 
you have not lost, but gained. 

Bernard P. McMahon 
Principal 







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MRS. EVELYN ANDERSEN 



MR. FRED BELLISSIMO 



Art Supervisor 



Boys' Physical Education 
Head Football Coach 
Assistant Basketball Coach 





MR. EDWARD BRADBURY 



MR. ROGER BREAKEY 



Algebra 1 & 2 

Trigonometry 

Sol id Geometry 

Shop Math 

Sophomore Class Advisor 

Student Council Advisor 



Biology 
Chem Lab 
General Science 
Health 



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MR. PAUL CIANO 



MR. LAWRENCE CUSHING 



Art 

Junior Class Advisor 

7th and 8th Grade Dramatic Club Advisor 



Director of Athletics 
and Physical Education 





MR. DOMENIC DE GRAZZIA 



MR. ANTHONY J. DE LUCA 



Band Director 



Driver Education 

General Business Training 

Stenography 2 



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MISS ELENE FARELLO 

Head of Science Department 
Student Council Advisor 



MISS ANNE FROTTEN 

Freshman Class Advisor 
Debating Club Advisor 
English 
Cheerleading Director 




MR. VINCENT GALLUCCI 

English 
Social Studies 



MR. ALBERT H. GIROUX 

World History 
American History 
Social Studies 
Freshmen Class Advisor 





MR. ALFRED G. HAMBELTON 



MR. JOHN HAMILTON 



Head Manual Arts Department 
Woodworking 



Guidance Director 
Economic Geography 
Problems of Democracy 




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MR. JAMES HANSEN 



Sheet Metal 



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MR. EDWARD KNUDSEN 

English 
Speech 








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MISS CAROLYN M. MAHER 



English 
Latin 
Dramatics Club 









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MISS LAURA N. MARLAND 

Head of English Department 
Alpha Staff Advisor 



MISS MARJORIE MARSHALL 

Remedial Reading 
English 



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miss alice McCarthy 

Girls' Physical Education 
Girls' Coach 




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MISS REGINA MITCHELL 

Home Economics 
Junior Class Advisor 




MR. ROBERT MULLARKY 

Economics 
Geography 
Basketball Coach 





^^*£<l MR. PAUL MURPHY 

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MR. WALTER PIERCE 

Shorthand 1 

Typing 1 

Clerical Practice 1 & 2 

General Business Training 





MR. RONALD PREBLE 



Printing 







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MR. ROBERT SABA 

Civics 

World History 
Ancient History 



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MISS IRENE M. SHARP 

Guidance 

Bookkeeping I & II 
Senior Class Advisor 
Senior Play Director 
Yearbook Advisor 






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MR. EDWARD SULLIVAN 



MRS. MARY THIEL 



Science 

German 2 

Advisor Science Club 




Typewriting 1 & 2 
Stenography 1 
Geography 
Commercial Club Advisor 




MRS. GEORGE WESBER 



MISS ELIZABETH WILSON 



Head of Commercial Department 

Senior Type 

Office Machines 

Secretarial Practice 

Senior Stenography 

Dean of Girl s 



Sophomore Class Advisor 
Foreign Language Club Advisor 
National Honor Society Advisor 
Modern Language 



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WILLIAM FAY, President 



J. PARKER PRINDLE, Vice President 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PHYLLIS RYAN, Secretary 



MARY ROSS, Treasurer 




34 








JOHN R. AMARO, JR. -- "Johnny" 

Course: Coll. 1, Gen. 2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 1,2,3, Co-Capt. 4; Base. 1,2,3,4; Int. Bask. 2,3; 

Pres. of Jun. Class; Stu. Guide 2; Dramatics Club 2; Prom Com. 3; 

Dance Com. 2,3)4; Ring Com. 3; Yearbook Staff 4; Senior Play 

Com. 4. 

Pet Peeve: Girls that say they can drive but really can't. 

Hobby: Phyllis R.: 

Ambition: To be happily married to my hobby. 



JACQUELINE ASHWORTH -- "Jackie" 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Bask. 1,2; Field Hockey 1,2; Soft. 1; Glee Club 1,2; 
Magazine Drive Capt. 1; Dramatic Club 1,2,3; For. Lang. Club 
2,3; Monitor 2; Prom Com. 3,4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Cheer. 4; Stu. 
Coun. 1; Yearbook Staff 4. 

Pet Peeve: Two faced people and getting up for school. 
Hobby: Billy and sports. 

Ambition: To graduate from college and become a lawyer's secre- 
tary. 





M. JOSEPH BARRY -- "Joe and Shorty" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 1,3,4; Bask. 2; Base. 1; Stu. Coun. Treas., 

Ring Com. 3; Prom Com. 3,4; Dramatics Club 2,3, V. Pres. 

Yearbook Staff 4; Senior Play 4; Int. Bask. 3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Self-centered people of the weaker sex. 

Hobby: Judy and Sports. 

Ambition: To have a class reunion in the year 2,000- 



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JOAN BENNETT -- "Joni" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Field Hockey 1,2; Soft. 2; Glee Club 1,2; Decoration 

Com. 4; Monitor 2; For. Lang. Club 2,3; Prom Decoration Com. 3; 

Dramatics Club 1,2; Decoration Com. 2; Chair. 3; Cheer 4. 

Pet Peeve: Prejudiced people, school. 

Hobby: Bob, Sports. 

Ambition: To be happily married to Bob. 




35 




JUDITH BLANCHARD -- "Judy" 

Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Glee Club 1,2; Monitor 2; Alpha 3; Yearbook 4; Foreign 

Lang. 2,3. 

Ambition: Success. 



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THOMAS BOWEN -- "Tommy" 

Course: College 1,2; Comm. 3; Mixed 4. 

Pet Peeve: Elephants that smoke cigars. 

Hobby: Head-hunting. 

Ambition: To own a hundred elephants. 





MARILYN LOUISE BOYLE -- "Mai" 

Course: Commercial 1,2,3,4. **£^ 

Activities: Bask. 1; Glee Club 1,2; Monitor 2; Foot. Cheer. 2,3,4, 

Bask. Cheerleader 2,3; Dramatics Club 2,3; Sec. Dramatics CI ub 4; 

Rally Comm. 4; Entertainment Comm. 4; Senior Play Cast 4;Dance 

Comm. 2. 

Pet Peeve: People who don't have a sense of humor. 

Hobby: Dancing, P. J. Parties, Swimming, Parties. 

Ambition: To find a cure for a Red-Headed Temper. 



LORRAINE C. BRENNICK -- "Lorry - Sheena" 

Course: Commercial 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Glee Club 1; Stu. Council 2; Stu. Monitor 4; Rally 

Comm. 3,4,; Dance Comm. 2,3,4; Stu. Exchange Rep. 4; Dramatic 

Club 2,3; Comm. Club 4; Reporter Football Cheerleader 3,4; 

Bask. Cheerleader 3; Senior Play Cheerleader. 

Pet Peeve: People who gossip. 

Hobby: The Coast Guard, having fun with the T. H. D. 

Ambition: To have a personality like "Ding's". To be anairline 

Stewardess. 




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PAUL K. BUTT ■- "Paul" 

Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 4, Bask. 1,2,3,4; Base. 1,2,4; Foreign Lang. 

2,3; Monitor 2; Boys Sports Editor, Year Book; Prom Comm.; Usher 

at Graduation 3, Decoration Comm. for dance 3. 

Pet Peeve: Insincere people. 

Hobby: Sports. 

Ambition: To find out what I want to do, and to do it! 





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DANIEL BURBINE -- "Dan" 

Course: College 1,2; General 3; Mixed 4. 

Activities: Baseball 1,2,4; Chair. Dance Comm. 4; Phot. Comm. 

4; Monitor 2,4; Foreign Lang. Club 2; Prom Comm. 4. 

Pet Peeve: Running out of cigarettes. 

Hobby: Rose. 

Ambition: To become a murderer to stir up business for Coomb's 

Funeral Home. 



JAMES COOMBS -- "Jim" 

Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Base. 1,4; Prom Decoration Comm. 3,4; Monitor 2; 

Dance Decoration Comm. 4; Yearbook Staff (Associate Editor); 

Intramural Bask. 2,4. 

Pet Peeve: People who don't die? 

Hobby: Sports, planting! 

Ambition: Become an undertaker. 






GERALD C. CHRISTOPHER -- "Jerry" 

Course: Commercial 1,2; General 3,4. 
Activities: Ice Hockey 2. 
Pet Peeve: Top gun of the old west. 
Hobby: Collecting shrunken heads. 
Ambition: To beat Wyatt to the draw. 



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JOHN F. DANIELS -- "John" 

Course: Gen 1,2,3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Walking to school every day. 

Hobby: Collecting firearms and hunting. 

Ambition: Graduate from high school and making good. 





ROBERT H. CORNISH - "Bob 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. Manager 1; Bask. 3,4, Co-Capt. 4; Base. 2,3,4; 

Stu. Coun. 4; Junior Rotarian 4; Motion Picture Projectionist 2,3,4; 

Eng. Book Closet 3,4; Monitor 2,4; Prom Com. 3; National Honor 

Society 3,4; Class Will; Stu. Ex. Rep. 4; Yearbook Staff 4. 

Pet Peeve: Getting up for school. 

Hobby: Sports. 

Ambition: To have a class reunion in 1978. 



JAMES AUGUSTINE DAY -- "Jim" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: For. Lang. Club 2,3; Chair. Decoration Comm. 4; 

Associated Ed. of Yearbook Com. 4; Monitor 2; Usher at Grad. 3. 

Pet Peeve: Non-conformists. 

Hobby: Tennis and driving. 

Ambition: To reach infinity. 





VIRGINIA DAWSON -- "Ginnie or Ginga" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Field Hockey 3,4; Bask. 3,4; Soft. 2,3,4; Dance 

Comm. 2,3,4; Comm. Club 3. 

Hobby: Dancing, sports, and driving. 

Ambition: To go to New York with Carol and Gwen graduation 

n ight. 



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EDWARD DE ANGELIS -- "Skipper" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Base. 1. 

Pet Peeve: People. 

Hobby: Weapons collection. New Car. 



SALVATORE A. DE PASQUALE -- "Salvy" 

Course: Comm. 1,2, Gen. 3,4. 
Pet Peeve: Driving through Boston. 
Hobby: Collecting old firearms. 
Ambition: Run my own business. 








DONALD DERRICO -- "Don" 
Course: Gen. 1,2,3,4. 
Pet Peeve: Teachers. 
Hobby: Cars. 
Ambition: To get rich. 



ALBERT DMNDIA -- "Al" 

Course: Industrial 1,2, Coll. 3, Gen. 4. 

Pet Peeve: Lunch. 

Hobby: Cars. 

Ambition: To have money. 




39 




PHYLLIS DOUCETTE -- "Sbultzy" 

Course: Commercial 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Prom Decorating Comm. 3; Refreshments Comm. 2,3,4; 

Entertainment Comm. 3,4; Senior Play Cast; Prom Decoration. 

Ambition: Being a secretary or a model. 



MARY DRISCOLL -- "Drickle" 

Course: College 1,2; Commercial 3,4. 

Activities: Commercial Club 4; Dramatics Club 4; Senior Play 

Cast. 

Pet Peeve: Getting up in the morning. 

Hobby: Dancing, Bowling, Parties. 

Ambition: To make a success of life. 





GERALD R. DUGGAN -- "Gerry" 

Course: Commercial 1,2; Mixed 3; General 4. 

Activities: Foreign Language Club. 

Pet Peeve: Driving with L. Von Kahle in Driver Ed. 

Hobby: Talking. 

Ambition: To be a railroad engineer. 



SANDRA LEE DUPRAS -- "Sandy" 

Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Driver Education, Foreign Language Club, Monitor. 

Pet Peeve: People who show off. 

Hobby: Horses and Paul. 

Ambition: To be a registered nurse. 




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JOANNE JUDITH ENOS 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Yearbook Staff 4; Prom Com. 3,4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; 

Dramatics Club 4; Stu. Guide 4; Senior Play Usherette 4. 

Pet Peeve: Getting up in the morning for school. 

Hobby: Having fun. 

Ambition: To go to CaJifornia with Judy and Paula. 





f KENNETH ELLIOTT » "Ken" 

j* Course: Gen. 1,2,3,4. 



JOHN FENLON -- "Paul" 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3, Gen. 4. 
Activities: Base. 3,4; Stu. Coun. 3. 
Hobby: Fixing Flats. 
Ambition: To go to college. 






WILLIAM JAMES FAY -- "Billy" 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Ice Hockey 4; Baseball 1,2,3,4; Pres. of Class 1,4; 
Band 1; Monitors 2; Int. Bask. 2; W. H. S. HiLites Sportswriter 3; 
Prom Com. 3,4; Dance Com. 4; Senior Play Com.; Asst. Ed. Year- 
book; Stu. Gov. Day Rep. 4. 
Pet Peeve: The Purple People Eater. 
Hobby: Sports. 

Ambition: To be a sportswriter and call Fenway Park and Boston 
Garden home. 



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LAWRENCE FOLEY -- "Ramar" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Baseball 2. 

Pet Peeve: Pygmies who steal chickens. 

Hobby: Rolling tires off the George Washington Bridge. 

Ambition: Find the lost treasure in the Okeefenokee Swamp. 





GWENDOLYN L. FISHER -- "Gwen" 
Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Field Hockey 2,3,4; Bask. 1,2,3,4; Capt. 4, All Star 3, 
4; Soft. 1,2,3, Capt. 4; Monitor 4; Art 1,2,4; Alpha Staff 3; Drama- 
tic club 2,3,4; Prom Com. 3,4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Senior Play 
Com. 4; Senior Yearbook 4. 
Pet Peeve: Cyclones. 
Hobby: Sports and Dancing. 
Ambition: Buy a house of my own. 



JUDITH ANN GOULD -- "Judy" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Yearbook Staff 4, Prom Com. 3; Dramatics Club 4, 

Dance Com. 2,3, 4; Driver education 4. 

Pet Peeve: Getting up every morning for school. 

Hobby; Joe, having fun. 

Ambition: To go to California with Joanne and Paula and Norine. 





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GERALD ALAN GALVIN -- "Jerry" 
Course: Comm. 1,2; Mixed 3, Gen. 4. 
Activities: Ice Hockey 1,2,3; Base. 2. 
Pet Peeve: Monday mornings. 
Hobby: Wild, wild, parties. 
Ambition: To retire at 25. 



42 




RICHARD GREGORY GRAHAM-- "Dick" 

Course: College 1,2; General 3,4. 

Activities: Base. 2,3; Captain 4; Disc, jockey at school dances. 

Pet Peeve: Heads that won't shrink. 

Hobby: Shrinking heads, Jungle music. 

Ambition: Witch Doctor. 



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JOSEPH W. GURSKI -- "Joe" 
Course: College 3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 3; Science Exhibit 3; Gymnastics 3; Weight- 
lifting 3,4. 

Hobby: Mary, bodybuilding. 
Ambition: Electronics Engineer. 





FRANK A. HALL - "Frank" 

Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 3,4; Vice Pres. Stu. Council 3; Alpha Staff 3,4; 

Monitor 3,4; Dramatics Club 3, Usher Graduation 3; Senior Play 

Cast 4; Driver Ed. 3. 

Pet Peeve: Self-centered individuals. 

Hobby: Extra-curricular activities, Sports. 

Ambition: To be as successful a teacher as Mr. "D." 

' ' ' ':. ' ' ' ....... ... 



TEXANN HANCOCK -- "Tex" 

Course: Commercial 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Dramatics Club 3; Stu. Council 1,2; Alfa Staff 3,4; 

Driver Ed. 4; Art Club 2,3; Dance Comm. 2,3,4; Prom Comm. 3,4; 

Monitor 4; Nominated for Girl's State 3. 

Pet Peeve: Waiting for slow people. 

Hobby: Fun and being with the T. H. D. 

Ambition: To live a happy life. 



43 




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WILLIAM JOHNSTON -- "Bill" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Foot. 1,2,3, Co-Capt. 4; Bask. Int.; Baseball 1,2,3,4; 

Pres. Stu. Coun . 4; Senior Play; Student Principal 4. 

Pet Peeve: Football coaches who yell at all times. 

Hobby: Sports. 

Ambition: To further my education and become a teacher. 



FLORENCE LORRAINE JUSTICE -- "Bonnie" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Alpha Staff 3,4; For. Lang. Club 2,3; Dance Com. 3,4; 

Monitor 2; Driver Ed.; National Honor Society 3,4; Class Prophecy. 

Pet Peeve: Tardy people; homework over the week end. 

Hobby: Dates and dancing. 

Ambition: To graduate from college. 





ROBERT JOHN KASZYNSKI— "Kasz" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Bask. 1; Band 1,2,3,4; For. Lang. Club 2,3; Science 

Club 2; Dramatics Club 2; Ski Club 4. 

Pet Peeve: Wise guys and conceited people. 

Hobby: Sail ing, water and snow skiing, hunting, archery, and cars. 

Ambition: To be a wealthy bachelor. 



NANCY PATRICIA KELLEY -- "Nancy" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Bask. Cheer. 4; Dramatics Club 2,3; Stu. Monitor 4; 

Prom Queen Attendant 1; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Prom Com. 3,4; 

Driver Ed. 4; Alpha Staff 3; Art Club 2. 

Pet Peeve: Discipline and being told what to do. 

Hobby: Talking on the telephone and being with the T.H.D. 

Ambition: To be the noisiest person in the world. 




44 



JOHN STUART KERR -- "johnny" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Chess Club 2; Dramatics Club 2; Bond 1,2,3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Homework. 

Hobby: Roller skating and bowling. 

Ambition: Engineer. 





NORINE KENDALL -- "Renie" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Yearbook Staff 4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Driver Ed. 3; 

Comm. Club 4; Senior Play 4. 

Pet Peeve: People who think that they are better than others. 

Hobby: Bobby, driving and dancing. 

Ambition: To go to California with Joanne, Judy, and Paula. 



JOSEPH LANDRY -- "Joe" 

Course: Coll. 1, Prac. Arts 2,3,4. 

Activities: Track 4; Prom Com. 4; Ski Club 4. 

Pet Peeve: Bad Weather. 

Hobby: Driving a '57 Chevrolet. 

Ambition: To be a Commercial Artist. 





CLIFFORD KNIGHT -■ "Cliff" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Base. 1; Monitor 2,4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Senior Play 

Com. 

Pet Peeve: Girl's who can't make up their minds. 

Hobby: Raising German Shepherds. 

Ambition: Have fun. 



45 



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DOROTHY ANN MAC DONALD -- "Dotty" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Stu. Coun. Secre. 4; Prom Com. 3; Cheer. 3,4; Driver 

Ed. 4; Bask. Cheer. Capt. 4; Alpha Staff 2; Dramatics Club 2,3; 

May Queen Attendant 1; For. Lang. Club 2; Dance Com. 2,3,4. 

Pet Peeve: "Can't follow my own advice" and truthful scales. 

Hobby: Talking, "getting even", dancing, and being with the 

T.H.D. 

Ambition: To laugh, love and be loved every day I may live. 





PAULA ANN LIENHARD -- "Red" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Bask. 1; Trea. of Class 1,2, half of 3; Dramatics Club 

1,2,3,4; Ring Com. 3; Yearbook Staff 4; Dance Com. 2,3,4; Monitor 

4; Senior Play 4. 

Pet Peeve: People who think they are better than others. 

Hobby: Dancing, driving, and having a good time. 

Ambition: To go to California with Judy, Joanne, and Norine. 



JOANNE ELIZABETH MC INNIS 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Soft. 1; Dance Com. 2,3,4; For. Lang. Club 2,3,4. 

Hobby: Records and dancing. 

Ambition: To be a nurse. 





THOMAS MC ANDREW -- "Tom" 

Course: Gen. 1, Coll. 2,3,4. 

Activities: Radio Club 3,4; Yearbook Staff 4; Chess and Cue Club 

2. 

Pet Peeve: A malfunctioning radio. 

Hobby: Radio Amateur Operator and experimenter. 

Ambition: Electronics Engineer or Technician. 



46 







CAROL ANN MC KAY -- "Cookie" 

Course: Commercial 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Field Hockey 3,4; Bask. 1,2,3,4, Manager; Soft. 3,4; 

Alpha 3,4; Art 2,3; Dance Comm. 2,3,4; Prom Comm. 3,4; Dramatics 

Club 2,3. 

Pet Peeve: Getting up in the morning. 

Hobby: Dancing, sports. 

Ambition: To go to New York with Gwen & Ginny, To own my own 

car. 



PETER F. MC MAHON -- "Pete" 
Course: College 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Student Council 1; Foreign Lang. 2,3; Alpha 3; Year- 
book Staff 4. 

Pet Peeve: Babies who turn around in their high chairs. 
Hobby: V. Canelas and Sons, Inc. 
Ambition: To skip school (without getting caught) 





y i 



NANCY MONTGOMERY -"Nancy" 

Course: College. 

Activities: Art Club 3; Alpha Staff 3; Senior Dance Comm. 4. 

Pet Peeve: Wilmington. 

Hobby: Drawing. 

Ambition: To become a commercial artist. 



GERALD A. MOSEY -- "Jerry" 

Course: College. 

Activities: Dance Comm. 4. 

Pet Peeve: Math courses. 

Hobby: Avoiding automobile accidents. 

Ambition: To eventually go to college. 




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47 






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SONJA MYRSTED -- "Lee" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3, Mixed 4. 

Activities: Glee Club 1; Majorette 1,2; Dramatics Club 2; Comm. 

Club 3; Art Club 3. 

Pet Peeve: Absent minded people. 

Hobby: Northeastern University. 

Ambition: To be a success in everything I do. 




A 



WARREN GENE NEWHOUSE -- "Old House" 

Course: Gen. 1,3, Prac. Arts 2,4. 

Activities: Base. 1,2,3; Alpha Staff 2. 

Pet Peeve: People borrowing my comb and mirror. 

Hobby: Girls, cars and records. 

Ambition: To own my own plane and learn to fly. 





WAYNE PRESCOTT -- "Pres" 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: School Magazine Rep. 2; Senior Usher 3; Class Mar- 
shall; Senior Prom Com. 3; Junior Play 3; Stu. Govt. Candidate 4. 
Pet Peeve: Girls (not all of them). 
Hobby: Eating. 
Ambition: Lawyer. 



JOHN PARKER PRINDLE JR. -- "/. P." 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Vice-Pres. 2,3,4; Ed-in Chief Yearbook 4; Class 

Essayist 4; Rep. to Boys State 3; Junior Rotarian 4; Ring Com. 3; 

Member Nat. Honor Soc. 3,4--Pres. 4; Usher at Grad. 3; Pres. 

Foreign Lang. Club 4; Chairman Dec. Com. Jr. Sr. Prom 3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Gym Class. 

Ambition: To win a Nobel Prize. 




48 



JOSEPH THOMAS ROSELLI -- "Tom" 

Course: Comm. 1,2, Gen. 3,4. 

Activities: Base. 2; Chess and Cue Club 2; Greers schooling 4. 

Pet Peeve: A Parsimonious Hobble-De-Hoy with Indefatigable Incivility. 

Hobby: Pickpocketing. 

Ambition: To be a Sub-Terranean Sanitation Engineer. 





RICHARD ROBBINS -- "Red" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: V. Pres. of Class. 1; Pres. of class 2; For. Lang. 

Club 1,2; Dramatics Club 1,2; Constitution Com. 1; Dance Com. 

1,2; Monitor 2. 

Pet Peeve: People. 

Hobby: Listening to Music. 

Ambition: To be the first kid on my block to rule the world. 



WALTER ROSS - "Bosco" 

Course: Coll. 1, Gen. 2,3,4. 

Activities: Alpha Staff 4. 

Pet Peeve: Girls that feel superior. 

Hobby: Having a good time and working. 

Ambition: To make the grade successfully. 





MARY IRENE ROSS - "Rusty" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Glee Club 1; Trea. of class 3,4; Dance Comm. 2,3,4; 

Art Club 1,2; Dramatics Club 2,3; Monitor 2; Cheer. 3; Prom Com. 

3,4; Senior Play Com. 4; Yearbook Staff 4; Ring Com. 3. 

Pet Peeve: Trying to pinch pennies from penny pinching seniors. 

Hobby: Joe, teaching me to drive. 

Ambition: To graduate from Lowell Academy of Hair Dressing. 



49 



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EDWARD GEORGE SAWYER JR. -- "Mickey" 

Course: Coll. 1; Tech. 2,3, Gen. 4. 

Activities: Foot. 3,4; Base. 2; For. Lang. Club 2; Monitor 2. 

Pet Peeve: False excuses. 

Hobby: My "47" Chevy. 

Ambition: To inject mosquitoes with the Salk Vaccine. 





PHYLLIS ANN RYAN - "Phyll" 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3, Mixed 4. 

Activities: Bask. 1; Glee Club 1; Secre. of class 1,2,3,4; May Day 
att. 1; Rememberance com. 1; Dramatic 2, pres. 4; For. Lang. 
Club 2; Dance Com. 1,2,3,4; Foot. Cheer. 2,3,4; Capt. 4; Bask. 
Cheer. 2,3; Rally Com. 2,3,4; Stu. Guide 2; Asst. Librarian 2; Art 
Club Pres. 3; Ring Com. 3; Prom Com. 3,4; Yearbook Staff 4; Pic- 
ture Com. 4; Const. Com. 1. 
Pet Peeve: Getting up mornings. 
Hobby: Doodling and having fun. 
Ambition: To achieve my goal in life. 



ROBERT EDWARD SHELLEY -- "Gus" 

Course: Comm. 1,2, Gen. 3,4. 

Activities: Ice Hockey 1,2,3; Band 1,2,3,4; Alpha Staff 3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Cars without Radios. 

Hobby: Sports. 

Ambition: To be a State Trooper. 





NORBERT C. SELL -- "Bert" 

Course: Coll. 1,2,3, Gen. 4. 

Activities: Bask. 2; For. Lang. Club 1,2,3; V. Pres. 2; Monitor 

1,2; Dramatics Club 2; Yearbook Staff 4; Dance Com. 2,3,4. 

Pet Peeve: Losing Money. 

Hobby: Making easy money. 

Ambition: To do well and be happy. 



50 




JANICE SPANKS -- "Jan" 

Course: Comm. 1,2,3,4. 

Activities: Field Hockey 3,4; Soft. 1,2,3,4; Dance Com. 

Coun.; Comm. Club 3,4, Board of Directors. 

Pet Peeve: Someone smiling on a Monday Morning. 

Hobby: Bowling, driving, borrowing Vinny's car. 

Ambition: To get a good job and work once i n a while. 



3; Stu. 



LARRY TUCKER -- "Butch and Skuck" 

Course: Comm. 1,2, Gen. 3,4. 

Activities: Alpha Staff; Driver Ed; Yearbook Staff. 

Pet Peeve: Flat Tires. 

Hobby: Fixing flat tires. 

Ambition: Invent a tire that can't go flat. 





PHILIP ARTHUR TUPPER -- "Phil" 

Activities: Bask. 3,4; Capt. 3, Co-Capt. 4; Track 4; Prom Com. 3,4; 

Eng. Book Closet 3,4; National Honor Society 3,4; Alpha Staff 3,4; 

Student Reporter for Crusader 4; Yearbook Staff 4; Literary Ed.; 

Stu. Coun. 4; All Star Bask. Team 3,4; Valedictorian. 

Pet Peeve: People who know nothing and tend to show it. 

Hobby: Sports and girls. 

Ambition: To become a Certified Public Accountant. 



ROBERT J. WATERHOUSE -- "Bob" 

Course: Coll. 1; Comm. 2,3,4; 

Pet Peeve : Working on the Car. 

Hobby: Saving money for the big day. 

Ambition: To marry Bobbie and finish Bentley's Accounting School 





ANDREW WILLIAM WHITE -- "Andy' 
Course: Coll. 1,2,3, Mixed 4. 



Acti 



vities; 



: oot. manager 1,3; Baseball 3; Dramatics Club 2,3,4; 



For. Lang. Club 2,3; Monitor 2,4; Picture Com. 4. 
Pet Peeve: Girls with dreamy blue eyes. 
Hobby: Girls and model railroading. 
Ambition: To be successful. 




HAROLD WHITE -- "Hal" 

Activities: Drama Club 1,2; National Honor Society 3,4; Alpha 

Staff Editor 4. 

Pet Peeve: People who think they're it and yet they're nothingl 

Hobby: Painting. 

Ambition: To become a C.P.A. 




y 




/ I 



ROGER WHITE -- "Maha" 

Course: Comm. 1, Prac. Arts 2,3,4. 

Activities: Alpha Staff 3,4; 

Hobby: Hunting polar bears in the Sahara Desert. 

Ambition: To see the South rise again. To blow out Liberace's 

candles. 



52 




LITERARY EDITORS 

Joanne Enos 

Robert Cornish 

Phill ip Tupper 



YEARBOOK STAFF 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

J. Parker Prindle 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

James Day 

William Fay 

James Coombs 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

John Amaro 
Mary Ross 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

Phyllis Ryan 
Jacqueline Ashworth 



SPORTS 

Gwendolyn Fisher 
Paul Butt 



ART 

Nancy Montgomery 

Joseph Landry 
Lawrence Tucker 



HUMOR 

Peter McMahon 
Richard Graham 



BUSINESS MANAGERS 

Bert Sell 

Clifford Knight 

Harold White 



COMPOSITION 

Joseph Barry 

Judith Gould 

Judith Blanchard 

Virginia Dawson 



53 



CLASS DIRECTORY 



NAME 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



Amaro, John 
Ashworth, Jacqueline 
Barry, M. Joseph 
Bennett, Joan 
Blanchard, Judith 
Bowen, Thomas 
Boyle, Marilyn 
Brennick, Lorraine 
Burbine, Daniel 
Butt, Paul 
Christopher, Gerald 
Coombs, James 
Cornish, Robert 
Daniels, John 
Dawson, Virginia 
Day, James 
DeAngelis, Edward 
DePasquale, Salvatore 
Derrico, Donald 
D'lndia, Albert 
Doucette, Phyllis 
Dri sco II, Mary 
Duggan, Gerald 
Dupras, Sandra 
Elliott, Kenneth 
Enos, Joanne 
Fay, William 
Fenlon, John 
Fisher, Gwendolyn 
Foley, Lawrence 
Galvin, Gerald 
Gibbons, Ronald 
Gould, Judith 
Graham, Richard 
Gurski, Joseph 
Hall, Frank 
Hancock, Texann 



Forest Street 


8-2166 


1 17 Church Street 


8-4777 


RFD, New Ipswich, N. H. 


82 Ring 4 


25 Burlington Avenue 


8-4649 


4 King Street 


8-2690 


100 Main Street 


— 


Birchwood Road 


8-2494 


Bout we II Street 


8-3732 


1 1 Mystic Avenue 


8-2647 


6 West Street 


8-2221 


65 West Street 


8-2194 


136 Shawsheen Avenue 


8-3537 


4 Central Street 


8-2241 


10 Parker Street 


8-4354 


113 Glen Road 


8-4094 


3 Powderhouse Circle 


8-4815 


310 Middlesex Avenue 


8-2908 


193 Main Street 


8-8359 


213 Burlington Avenue 


8-3521 


Adelman Road 


8-2762 


Nickerson Avenue 


8-3966 


449 Middlesex Avenue 


8-4045 


4 Harvard Avenue 


8-2119 


45 Andover Street 


8-3539 


9 Norfolk Avenue 


8-2728 


227 Shawsheen Avenue 


8-2025 


18 Brand Avenue 


8-4820 


47 Burnap Street 


8-2161 


56 Burnap Street 


8-2448 


121 West Street 


8-4443 


278 Chestnut Street 


8-3283 


Birchwood Road 


— 


10 Oakridge Circle 


8-2704 


Shady Lane Drive 


8-4853 


154 Federal Street 


8-3135 


666 Woburn Street 


8-2486 


8 Dunton Road 


8-3024 






CLASS DIRECTORY - CONTINUED 



NAME 

Johnston, Willi am 
Justice, Florence 
Kaszynski, Robert 
Kelley, Nancy 
Kendall, Norine 
Kerr, John 
Knight, Clifford 
Landry, Joseph 
Lienhard, Paula 
MacDonald, Dorothy 
McAndrew, Thomas 
Mclnnis, Joanne 
McKay, Carol 
McMahon, Peter 
Montgomery, Nancy 
Mosey, Gerald 
Myrsted, Sonja 
Newhouse, Warren 
Prescott, Wayne 
Prindle, J. Parker 
Robbins, Richard 
Ross, Mary 
Ross, Walter 
Rosselli, Joseph 
Ryan, Phyllis 
Sawyer, Edward 
Sell, Norbert 
Shelley, Robert 
Spanks, Janice 
Tucker, Lawrence 
Tupper, Philip 
Waterhouse, Robert 
Watt, Rodney 
White, Andrew 
White, Harold 
White, Roger 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



8 Fairmeadow Road 


8-4123 


45 Brand Avenue 


8-4308 


3 Jones Avenue 


8-2528 


41 Shawsheen Avenue 


8-3446 


7 Silverhurst Avenue 


8-2111 


71 Nichols Street 


8-4128 


100 Andover Street 


— 


Taft Road 


8-2900 


Elwood Road 


8-2328 


Parker Street 


8-3746 


1 1 Wi lliams Avenue 


8-2015 


8 Gunderson Road 


8-4629 


56 Burnap Street 


8-2448 


15 Floradale Avenue 


8-3032 


10 Powderhouse Circle 


8-3881 


14 Lawrence Street 


8-4372 


Ballardvale Street 


8-3959 


Taft Road 


8-4673 


Oakdale Road 


8-8538 


117 Middlesex Avenue 


8-3001 


297 Burlington Avenue 


8-3436 


874 Main Street 


8-4997 


874 Main Street 


8-4997 


Randolph Road 


8-2717 


1 Pond Street 


8-2615 


Gage Hill, Pelham, N. H. 


Tw 8-5798 


2 Oakwood Road 


8-2355 


Atlantic Avenue 


8-4475 


152 Main Street 


8-3455 


Hillside Way 


8-3705 


91 Pineridge Road 


8-3935 


31 Swain Road 


8-4708 


395 Chestnut Street 


8-3111 


95 Boutwell Street 


... 


7 Parker Street 


8-4624 


6 Harvard Avenue 


— 







S 
E 
N 
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O 
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CLASS ACTOR AND ACTRESS 

Frank and Lorry 



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TYPICAL WHS STUDENTS 

Paul and Phyl 




56 




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TALLEST AND SHORTEST 

Mary and Joe 
Tom and Texann 



CLASS SWEETHEARTS 

Judy and Joe 



57 






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Judy and Bi II 




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Mary and Pete 



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SENIOR SUPERLATIVES 



BOY 

Parker Prindle 
Parker Prindle 
Joseph Gurski 
Frank Hall 
James Day 
Robert Cornish 
William Fay 
James Coombs 
Frank Hall 
Parker Prindle 
Parker Prindle 
Joseph Gurski 
Parker Prindle 
Peter McMahon 
Parker Prindle 
William Fay 
Bert Sell 
Paul Butt 
Parker Prindle 
Robert Corni sh 
Parker Prindle 
Joseph Barry 
Joseph Rosselli 
Willi am Johnston 
John Amaro 



TITLE 
Most Industrious 
Largest Vocabulary 
Class Debators 
Frankest 
Sleepiest 
Most Courteous 
Class Optimists 
Class Pessimi sts 
Class Actor-Class Actress 
Most Dependable 
Most Studious 
Class Show-offs 
Most Sophisticated 
Teachers' Ruin 
Busiest Seniors 
Best Dressed 
Best Dancers 
Most Versatile 
Most Likely To Succeed 
Most Respectful 
Most Intelligent 
Tallest 
Shortest 
Noi siest 
Best Athlete s 



GIRL 
Phyllis Ryan 
Florence Justice 
Lorraine Brennick 
Joan Bennett 
Lorraine Brennick 
Phyllis Doucette 
Phyllis Ryan 
Judith Blanchard 
Lorraine Brennick 
Phyllis Ryan 
Florence Justice 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Mary Ross 
Phyllis Ryan 
Judith Gould 
Lorraine Brennick 
Gwen Fisher 
Judith Blanchard 
Phyllis Doucette 
Florence Justice 
Mary Ross 
Texann Hancock 

Lorraine Brennick 
Gwen Fi sher 



60 



SENIOR SUPERLATIVES - CONTINUED 



BOY 

Joseph Landry 

John Amaro 

Paul i-.utt 

Joseph Landry 

Paul Butt 

Robert Shelley 

Gera Id Ch ri sto ph er 

Wi Hi am Fay 



Walter Ross 
Robert Shelley 

Gerald Duggan 



Richard Graham 
William Fay 
Gerald Mosey 
John Daniels 
Joseph Barry 
Joseph Landry 
Wi 1 1 i am F ay 
Joseph Gurski 
William Rooney 
John McCabe 
Arthur Hall 



TITLE 
Class Artists 

Best Build-Best Figure 

Typical WHS Students 

Most Bashful 

Handsomest- Prettiest 

Prettiest Eyes 

Prettiest Hair 

Best Personality 

Class Pals 

Class Woman Hater 

Class Man Hater 

Class Clowns 

Class Flirts 

Laziest 

Class Babies 

Class Sweethearts 

Quietest 

Most Popular 

Hottest Tempers 

Most Popular Juniors 

Most Popular Sophomores 

Most Popular Freshmen 



GIRL 

Nancy Montgomery 
Son ja Myrsted 
Phyllis Ryan 
Nancy Montgomery 
Sonja Myrsted 
Phyllis Ryan 
Mary Ross 
Phyllis Ryan 

Nancy Kelley 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Texann Hancock 



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Nancy Montgomery 
Lorraine Brennick 
Lorraine Brennick 
Sonja Myrsted 
Carol McKay 
Judith Gould 
Nancy Montgomery 
Phyllis Ryan 
Mari lyn Boyle 
Genie Emery 
Carol Perella 
Dorothy DeGrasse 



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CLASS OFFICERS 

Kenneth Quast, President 
Judith Lewis, Vice President 
Genie Emery, Treasurer 
Beth Byam, Secretary 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Earl Hubbard, Vice President, Counci 
Patricia Hamilton 
Sandra Jensen 
Ann Marie Sull ivan 




64 



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Sandra Bouvier 
Joan Marshall 
Charles Sweet 




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CLASS OFFICERS 

Mercedes Strow, President 

Arthur Hall, Vice President 

Barbara Lynch, Secretary 

Diane Imbimbo, Treasurer 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Robert Gage 
George Szadis 




68 



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FOOTBALL 



Football at W.H.S. this year was very successful. Experience, gained by the team's first loss to 
Burlington, proved invaluable for their next three wins over Bedford, Ayer, and Dracut. Chelms- 
ford and North Andover next invaded Wilmington handing us two of our three losses. The next win 
came at the expense of North Reading, a new member of the Suburban League, on Dedication Day, 
at the new Athletic Field. 

The crowning achievement of the season was Wilmington's 21-14 win over Tewksbury. The game 
was held on Thanksgiving morning for the first time in some years, and is to become a traditional 
Turkey Day game. 

Over all, Wilmington's football team enjoyed its most successful season since the 1948 unde- 
feated team, winning five and losing three. 



72 



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The Football Cheerleaders, under the able direction of Phyllis Ryan, Cap- 
tain, cheered long and lustily for the home team. They were: Marilyn Boyle, 
Lorraine Brennick, and Dorothy MacDonald, senior members; Genie Emery, Judy 
Lewis, Beth Byam, and Jeanne Marshall, junior members; and Carol Randell, 
Annette Visconti, and Amanda Brabant, sophomore members. Alternates were: 
senior Joan Bennett, junior Joanne Page, and sophomore Eileen Cotter. 



CHEERLEADERS 



The Basketball Cheerleaders under the direction of Captain Dorothy Mac- 
Donald gave creditable performances at all the games. They were: Nancy Kelley, 
senior; Genie Emery and Sandra Higgins, juniors; Joan Marshall and Joann Han- 
cock, sophomores; and Joan Butt and Dorothy DeGrasse, freshmen. Alternates 
were: Jackie Ashworth, senior; Bonnie Hooper, junior; Sandra Joseph, sopho- 
more; and Judy Condrey, freshman. 







. 



NM ■*•*-****• 




The cheerleaders were 
divided into two groups-- 
one for football, and one 
for basketball, both se- 
lected competitively. 

During the football 

season, at the home 
games, the girls marched 
on to the field pulling a 
gay blue and white circus 
wagon in which reposed, 
in regal silence, the new 
team mascot, Willy the 
Wildcat. Willy was quite 
resplendent in a royal blue 
satin top hat and cape, 
lavishly decorated with 
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VARSITY BASKETBALL 



The basketball team had a fairly successful season under the direction of Miss McCarthy, 
and Captain Gwen Fisher. The team ended the year with a five-win, seven-loss record. The girls 
again overcame their rival of many years, Tewksbury, with scores of 46-34 in the first game, and 
46-42 in the final game. 

At the close of the season, Wilmington was represented in the Suburban League All-Stars 
Game by Captain Gwen Fisher, and Judy Lewis. 

With the loss of only two members of the team, Miss McCarthy expects to have a well-experi- 
enced team next year. 

The members of the team are: Captain Gwen Fisher, Jeanne Marshall, Carol Randell, Nancy 
Bennett, Eileen Cotter, Marion Dawson, Gertrude Cushing, Judy Lewis, Virginia Dawson, Joanne 
Page, and Judy Rosselli. The managers are Carol McKay and Regina Klements. 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



The Junior Varsity Team had put in a good season, winning three out of their six games. The 
school is proud of this growing team which shows promise of a good fighting spirit in the future. 

Members of the team are: Marion Halpin, Mary Quandt, Pat Phillips, Amanda Brabant, Sharon 
Phillips, Celia Spear, Judy Mac Melville, and Eleanor Kemp. Managers are: Loretta Dawson, Janice 
Buck, Marilyn McKay, and Donna May. 



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BASKETBALL 

The WHS basketball team got off to its most successful season in quite a few years by win- 
ning its first sixgames. No doubt, the most exciting game in this string was a 55 to 53 win over 
Chelmsford in a sudden death, double overtime game. 






Of the remaining eleven games, the team won five, falling into a mild slump, 
finished the season with an over-all record of eleven won and six lost. 



The team 



Due to the efforts of Coach Mullarky, and Assistant Coach Bellissimo, Captains Cornish and 
Tupper and the team remained a formidable unit throughout the season. 

Members of the varsity were: Philip Tupper, Paul Butt, Winston Fairfield, George Munroe, 
Robert Cornish, Joseph Casey, Warren McFeeters, Theodore Chiricos and Albert Penny. 



80 






Robert Mullarky, Head Coach 




Fred Bellissimo, Assistant Coach 



TOM 



■ 




FIELD HOCKEY 



The Field Hockey Team had a very successful season this year, winning all of their nine 
games. The girls averaged 27 goals for the season while their opponents only scored twice 
on this fighting team. 

Credit for the team's success is due in large part to the efforts of Captain Judy Rosselli, and 
Coach Miss McCarthy. 

During the season, only one team gave the girls any trouble, and that was North Andover. 
However, Wilmington went on to win with two goals to North Andover's one. 

The members of the team are: Captain Judy Rosselli, Virginia Dawson, Gwen Fisher, Carol 
McKay, Janice Spanks, Gertrude Cushing, Regina Klements, Joann Hancock, Ruth Sullivan, Pat 
Manuel, Judy Iverson, Loretta Dawson, Mary Quandt, Carol Crispo, Dawn Iverson, and Janice 
Kimball. 



82 



SOFTBALL 

With the coaching of Miss McCarthy, assisted by Captain Janice Spanks, the Girls' Softball 
Team had put in a good season. They ended their season with five wins and four losses. 

The team has many new players this year who now have a season of experience behind them. 
They give promise of putting on a good show next year. 

The members of the team are: Captain Janice Spanks, Gwen Fisher, Carol McKay, Virginia 
Dawson, Judy Rosselli, Gertrude Cushing, Carol Randell, Beth Byam, Janice Kimball, Joanne 
Enos, Nancy Bennett, Joanne Page, Marion Dawson, Marion Halpin, Marlene Kimball, and Pat 
Shelley. 




83 






TRACK 



The first year of track at W.H.S. began on a high note. Coached by Mr. Kelly, the squad 
started the season with a loss, in a dual meet with Bedford. They bounced back with successive 
wins over North Reading twice, and Bedford once. A surprisingly close loss to Class A, Arling- 
ton, and a second place in the Suburban Meet at North Andover completed the season. 






The enthusiasm shown by the track team, led by Captain Joe Landry, certainly is an example 
to be followed in future years. 







84 







BASEBALL 



Possessing the spirit and willingness of sportsmen shown by the basketball and football teams, 
the 1958 baseball team won five and lost eight finishing sixth in the Suburban League Final 
Standings. 

One of the upsets of the year was an early season victory over Chelmsford, the Suburban Champ- 
ions. 

The winningest pitcher, Joe Peters, collected four of the five victories. The other was a one hit 
shutout over Dracut by James Coombs. 

The leading hitter was Bob Cornish who finished the season with a .309 Batting average. 

Perhaps the leading optimist of the team was Coach Gilligan, whose never-say-die attitude en- 
couraged the boys tremendously. 

The Assistant Coach was Mr. Keady. 
Members of the Varsity were: 



Allen MacDonald 

Joe Peters 

Robert Cornish 
Paul Butt 



William Fay 

Richard Graham 

John Amaro 

Daniel Bemis 

Edward Palino 



85 



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STUDENT COUNCIL 



Under the direction of Miss Elene Farello and Mr. Edward Bradbury, the Student Counci 
had another prosperous year. 






The activities sponsored by the Student Council this year include the annual Anti-Vandal- 
ism Assembly in October; a guest speaker, Rev. Dr. Dewey Peterson, who spoke on Russia; a 
Clothing Drive for "Save the Children Federation"; Kris Kringle Karnival, a Toy Party at Christ- 
mas held to collect gifts which were distributed to five orphanages in Lowell and Lawrence; the 
Monitor System was revived; and an Appreciation Tea was given for the teachers. 

Student Council membership includes: 



President Wi lliam Johnston 

Vice President Earl Hubbard 

Secretary Dorothy MacDonald 

Treasurer Joseph Barry 

Robert Cornish 
Philip Tupper 
Patricia Hamilton 
Sandra Jensen 
Ann Marie Sul livan 
Sandra Bouvier 
Joan Marshall 
Charles Sweet 



Robert Gage 
George Szadi 
D&ah ILaii 
John Farley 
Elaine Hersom 
Rita Bevi lac qua 
Elaine LaRivee 
Gerald Pagl ia 



88 




ALPHA STAFF 



The Alpha Staff, under the direction of Miss Laura Marland, Head of the English Department, 
has completed its fifth year. 

The paper was produced with the help of the school printing department. 
The Staff includes: 

Editor: Harold White 

Assistant Editors: Parker Prindle, Patricia Hamilton, Albert Penny 

Literary Editors: Neil McCormack, Hugh McCormack, Kenneth Quast 

Administration Reporters: Florence Justice, Barbara Rugoletti 

Guidance Reporters: Beth Byam, Texann Hancock 

Special Reporters: Genie Emery, Linwood Kemp 

Student Government Reporters: Eileen LePore, Donna May 

Alumni Reporters: Carol McKay, |va Bedell 

Senior Reporter: Philip Tupper 

Junior Reporters: Alice Blackburn, Sandra Higgins 

Sophomore Reporter: Jeannie Woods 

Glee Club: Sandra Jensen 

Boy's Sports: Arthur Dromgoole, George Munroe 

Girl's Sports: Judith Roselli, Nancy Bennett 

Humor: Robert Cornish, Ernie Moeglin, Michael Bodnar 

Circulation: Frank Hall, Thomas Fuller, David O'Brien, Earl Hubbard. 



89 









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90 



WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL BAND 



Under the able direction of BandMaster Domenic DeGrazzia, and Drill Master Joseph Beaton, the 
Wilmington High School Band is an organization of which the school and the town can be justly 
proud. 




.■■'■■■■ 



*»*»« 



91 




SCIENCE CLUB 



The Science Club, with Mr. Edward Sullivan as advisor, had a very successful year. The mem- 
bers of the club were in charge of the Second Annual Science Fair, in which the students of the 
High School were encouraged to participate and display their scientific projects. 

Edward Curtis won first prize in the local Science Fair for his project on Solar Evaporation. He, 
then, went on to the Boston Globe Science Fair, which was held at M. I.T., where he won honor- 
able mention for his work. 





RADIO CLUB 



The Radio Club, now in 
its second year, is still 
working toward their 
ultimate goal--a radio 
station in the high 
school. They had as 
their advisor this year, 
Mr. Hansen. 



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FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB 

The Foreign Language Club, comprising approximately forty members, completed its third year 
successfully. The new advisor selected this year was Miss Elizabeth Wilson. Perhaps the most 
interesting activity engaged in by the Club is pen-pal writing. The members have many correspon- 
dents in foreign lands, many of whom write in their native tongue, thus giving the Club mem- 
bers a chance to use their ability to translate into English. 



93 



COMMERCIAL CLUB 

The Commercial Club sponsored several projects this year including a project on shorthand 
and typing work done by a chosen committee and displayed in the showcase near Room 202. For 
a Christmas Project, plants were purchased and distributed to the patients of the Tewksbury 
State Hospital. A field trip was taken to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company, in 
Lowell. 

A business library was established by Mrs. Thiel, consisting of many business magazines 
and booklets that pertain to the business world. 

The officers, under the guidance of Mrs. Mary Thiel, are as follows: 

Judith Lewis President 

Pollyanna Smith Vice President 

Nora Letellier Treasurer 

PatriciaGatta Secretary 

Lorraine Brennick Reporter 




94 






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DRAMATICS CLUB 

The Dramatics Club, with Miss Carolyn Maher, as advisor, completed another year. Monthly meet- 
ings were held in which many items of interest were discussed. Officers were elected and pro- 
jects initiated. The elected officers were: 

President Phyllis Ryan 

Vice President, Joseph Barry 

Treasurer Eileen Cotter 

Secretary Marilyn Boyle 





GLEE CLUB 



The Wilmington High School Glee Club, under the direction of Miss Lorraine Kalil, has had a 
very successful year. They have entertained at the Christmas Assembly, taken part in a special 
PTA program, entertained during intermission as various assemblies during the year, and, as 
always, made graduation more memorable by their very skillful renditions of special music for 
graduation. 




96 






■ H 



'■'.■' 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

The Wilmington Chapter of the National Honor Society of Secondary School s is Number 2186. 

The purpose of this chapter is to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a de- 
sire to render service, to promote worthy leadership, and to encourage the development of the 
character of students in Wilmington High School. 

The elected members of this chapter must atjain a grade of 85 percent or better and their 
election shall be based on scholarship, service, leadership, and character. 

The following were elected to membership: 

President J- Parker Prindle 

Vice President Linwood Kemp 

Secretary Florence Justice 

Treasurer Ann Marie Sullivan 

Pollyanna Smith Wayne Prescott 

Patricia Hami Iton Harold White 

George Munroe Robert Cornish 

David Hartwell Philip Tupper 

James Coombs 



Advisor Miss Elizabeth Wilson 




97 












SKI CLUB 

The Ski Club was more or less of an experimental club, organized with Mr. Knudsen as 
advisor, to plan for ski trips and the like in the coming year. No officers were elected. It was, in 
form, a discussion and planning group. 







98 






MR 



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MONITORS 



The Monitor staff was again organized this year, under the sponsorship of Student Council. 
Mr. Bradbury was in charge of the group, and Earl Hubbard was Head Monitor. The job was a 
voluntary one. Anyone who desired to become a monitor made his wishes known and was then 
checked out by Mr. Bradbury and the office. If the volunteer was accepted, he, or she, was given 
an armband. 



99 




SENIOR PLAY 

"CURTAIN CALL FOR CLIFFORD'' 

CAST 

Clifford L. Mumford (Inspector Sherrington) Harold White 

Miss Eda Troutliver Phyllis Ryan 

Donna Bratton (Celia Blackborn) Paula Lienhard 

Grant "Biff" Reese William Johnston 

Flooper Bushman (Marie, the maid) Jacqueline Ashworth 

Mr. Harry DeWilde Andrew White 

Joyce (Lady Blackborn) Phyllis Doucette 

Sidney (Lord Blackborn) Frank Hall 

Andy (Wilkins, the butler) Joseph Barry 

Jerome—Electrician, voice off stage Richard Robbins 

Student l--Prop Girl Gwen Fisher 

Student ll--Stage hand Robert Kaszynski 

Student lll--Prom.pt girl Norine Kendall 

Cheerleaders, Football players 

Miss Irene M. Sharp, Director 

Miss Carolyn Maher, Makeup 
John Amaro, Lights 



■ .•y?^ 




TROUTLIVER: 



— Remember you're in love— very much in love with each other. I'll give 
you the cue: "Come, Mother, let's leave our two young people alone." 



ANDY: (Wilkins, the Butler) (Sinisterly) Thank you, Inspector. I was just coming 

in to see if you desire anything before I retire. 








BIFF: 



How much longer am I going to be stuck here waiting for you? 



DONNA: 



I can't leave till rehearsal's over, but we're on the last act. 



TROUTLIVER: 



---Now, I'd like to read a scene between Celia and the Inspector. It's 
one of the love scenes—where they first realize they care for each 

other. All right, Sidney. Page forty. 



SIDNEY: 



Let's have that copy of the script. 




Miss Carolyn Maher, Makeup 




CLIFFORD: Biff, It's in the script-we're 
supposed to kiss each Oiher. 

BIFF: Listen, Buster, as of right now, 

it's out of the script. There 
better not be any of that love 
stuff tomorrow night! 



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MISS TROUTLIVER: Flooper Bushman, take your 

hands away from this ladder! 

FLOOPER: Well, when are we going to 

start? It's late! In all my years 
on Broadway, I was never sub- 
jected to anything like this! 




Miss Irene M. Sharp, Director 
























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The annual Junior-Senior Prom was held on May 16, 1958, in the gym, gaily decorated in 
true oriental fashion, and called, appropriately enough, the Oriental Gardens. 

The Prom Queen and her attendants were as follows: 



Queen Jackie Ashworth 

Attendants 

Dorothy MacDonald 
Sonja Myrsted 
Pollyanna Smith 
Joanne Page 



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GRADUATION NIGHT 




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109 



VALEDICTORY 



BRIGHT HORIZONS 



The horizons are bright for this graduating 
class, the future leaders of this community. 
There is room for us in business, in science, 
and in industry. There is a great demand for 
high school students who go to college to fur- 
ther their education. It is for this purpose that 
we study hard to increase our knowledge and 
our skills. 

Through study in school and through interest in 
social life we increase our knowledge and our 
interest. By observing our teachers and leaders, 
and our fellow students we learn about different 
ideas and different ways of doing things. Thus, 
we learn for ourselves the best way of doing 
things through experience and constant prac- 
tice. We strive to improve our ways and our 
skills, and, through the leadership of our teach- 
ers, we learn the best way to do things. Through 
constant hard work and study, we improve our 
minds and our bodies. If we owe anyone praise 
for our advancement and our growth, it is due 
our teachers who guide us onward. 

As we continue through the grades, upward 
through junior high school, and finally into high 
school, we change our ways into a set pattern 
of doing things. We do one thing one way, and 
another thing another way. As we do these 
things again, we do them the same as we've 
done them before, and as we will continue to do 
them, because we are firmly convinced that our 
way is the best way. We believe we have found 
the best way for us. When we have come to this 
stage in our lives, we feel that we have reached 
the limit of our capacity because we think we 
have tried all ways and found the best. We feel 
that we have done everything that can be done 
and can go no further. 




Then comes a great day in our lives. We have 
come to the point where we have been chosen to 
lead instead of to follow. We are now giving the 
directions and someone else is following them. 
We are now coming to the point where we must 
pick our fields of endeavor, and develop them to 
the fullest extent so as to prepare for the day 
that we go out into the world on our own. 

We must choose our profession with the very 
greatest of detail, for we are to pursue this 
course for the rest of our lives. Once we choose 
it and start on our way, we do not have much 
chance to change, for few ever change their 
profession. With our new profession, we start 
a livelihood that succeeds to any extent depend- 
ing on the persons themselves. In business we 
have to stick to one profession because busi- 
ness wants the ones who are best trained in 
their fields, and as you know, it is easier to be 
superior in one skill, than it is in more than 
one. We must choose one career and stick with 
it always. 

Because we are going to continue our careers 
in order to make a living, we must study hard to 
learn as much as we can about our chosen 
fields so as to become experts in them. The 
more we know about our careers, the more we 
are in demand by persons who need us in their 
businesses; the more we are in demand, the 
more money we make because we are experts in 
our fields. Our teachers help us in the selection 
of our careers and we must make the most of 
these opportunities by helping ourselves. 



1 10 







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Why does business need us? Why do the experts 
get the best jobs? These are questions that we 
all must ask ourselves. The answers are simple. 
Business needs us because business is contin- 
ually expanding and looking for new employees. 
The experts get the best jobs because they are 
better qualified for the positions than are the 
persons who quit school at the age of sixteen, or 
failed to study and just got by in school. Bus- 
iness is continually on the lookout for high 
school students who are interested in their pro- 
fessions and will go as far as to send them to 
school at company expense to help train the 
student in the ways of the business and the job 
he is interested in. As soon as he finishes the 
course, the company will put him right on the 
job, sometimes hiring him for a probationary per- 
iod; oftentimes hiring him permanently. 

So as you see the horizons are bright for us, the 
graduating class of 1958. We have finished our 
training period in our twelve years of school. 



Now, this class will break up and spread to all 
parts of the United States and perhaps to other 
parts of the world. Some will go on to further 
their education in college; others will go right 
on to jobs; still others will go on to serve their 
country in the armed forces. We will go forth to 
fulfill our parts in this great world and to play 
our parts in the earth's cycle. So, the horizons 
are bright with promise as we leave our second 
home, the school, to go on our different ways, 
to the different careers and professions we have 
been trained for in this wonderful school of ours. 

We shall be forever grateful to our many teachers 
who have guided us and molded us into the 
persons we now are and the persons we shall 
try to be in the future. 

Philip Tupper 



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111 



SALUTATORY 

A TURN IN THE ROAD 




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The Class of 1958 welcomes you to this our 

graduation, the completion of twelve years of 

preparation to meet the needs of a fast-chang- 
ing world. 

Truly this very evening presents, in itself, a 
turn in the road. We must all, however, avoid 
the road to evil. The road we choose must have, 
in our own minds, no other alternative than to 
lead us to a richer, fuller, and a happier life. 
The road we choose will not be one made of 
tar nor one which has all the bumps smoothed 
out, for along the road of life are many hard- 
ships. These obstacles must not be allowed to 
hinder our progress in any way whatever. We 
must learn to overcome these obstacles even 
though it may mean a sacrifice on our parts. We 
shall not be the first to give up something we 
cherish in order to make our own lives, as well 
as the lives of others, easier in some way; nor, 
shall we be the last. 

There are many roads from which we may 
choose. One road which will be taken by many 
of us is that of education. There are many of us 
who will be consumers—consumers of know- 
ledge, for we know that a well-rounded edu- 
cation is essential in many fields today. We 
must, however, decide for ourselves what road 
we are to take. No longer do we have the valued 
guidance of teachers, counselors, and adminis- 
trative officials. No longer will we have the en- 
vironment that is so familiar to each of us. 



Things are changing--changing fast. Things that 
we considered dreams of the future are now within 
our grasp. Beginning this very night, just as 
soon as we accept our diplomas, is a new life 
for each and everyone of us. It may frighten 
some; it may seem unbelieveable to others; to 
still others, they may look on it as a time of 
joyous leave-taking. To the latter few, in five- 
years, you will wish that you were back in 
school. Things were easy for us then, you will 
think. If one can adapt himself in high school 
to the course he has chosen, he will have no 
difficulty whatsoever in meeting and overcoming 
the problems that the world presents to him. 
There will be no difficulty in evaluating cir- 
cumstances so that decisions or advice will be 
accurate and for the best. 

Most assuredly none of us will ever get ahead 
if we sit back and let someone do our work for 
us. Each of us has been equipped with a basic 
knowledge of the subjects that we are to use in 
our adult life. For demonstrative purposes we 
shall call this knowledge a "fixed asset". 
We must not allow depreciation to enter the 
picture and lower the value of the asset, but we 
must increase the value of the asset at a never- 
ending pace. We must subject ourselves to the 
ordeals and strains of increasing the value of 
the "fixed asset". The only outcome which I 
can foresee is one for the best. 



112 



In order to establish ourselves in the world, we 
must be able to get along with other people. 
Those of us who are going to further our edu- 
cation will be taught this in advanced training, 
for in almost every curriculum there is a course 
in human psychology. Those of us who will be 
seeking employment, however, must be able to 
adapt themselves to the natures and under- 
standings of other people. This must be done 
with no hindrance to our own personal beliefs 
and at no sacrifice of our own character or 
reputation. 

There looms before each of us a dark and un- 
certain path. It is up to us, by using what know- 
ledge we have gained, to lighten this path so 
that we shall not stumble into the many crev- 
ices of life. We must take the attitude of an 
individualist and not conform to another's 
ideas and ideals; yet, we must not let the idea 
of individualism get out of control. If this were 
allowed to happen it would be most unfortunate 
for al I concerned. 



We must enter the world with a dauntless cour- 
age and a clear conscience. There must be no 
preconceived ideas lurking in the back of our 
minds. There is so much that we can do to 
better the world. Yet, how much will be done? 
There are so many opportunities of which we 
may avail ourselves. Perhaps much will 
be done and opportunities accepted; perhaps 
little will be done and opportunities refused. 
The road we take depends entirely on what we 
want to make of ourselves. 

It is with sad hearts that we bid farewell to 
Wilmington High School whose memories will 
always have an honored place in our hearts. 

Harold White 










113 









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» 



CLASS HISTORY 



i 



When we entered Wilmington High School 
four years ago, in September, 1954, little did we 
realize how our next four years were destined to 
be spent. At first, we wandered the corridors of 
the high school, unsure of ourselves--the same 
corridors which later on in the year we were to 
walk with confidence. 

Our class advisors for the Freshman year 
were Miss Horner and Mr. Barrett who helped us 
draw up our constitution and run our class 
meetings. For our class officers, we elected 
William Fay, President; Richard Robbins, Vice 
President; Phyllis Ryan, Secretary; and Paula 
Lienhard, Treasurer. We made the acquaintance 
of teachers who were to know us throughout 
our entire high school careers. Unfortunately, 
our Freshman year was clouded by the untimely 
death of a classmate, William Emmons, who 
though gone will ever remain a part of our class. 

When we returned to classes in our Sopho- 
more year, we had to again get used to a new 
building in that we were now in homerooms in 
the new wing of the high school which had been 
completed in the summer months. Our class 
advisors were Miss Sharp and Mr. Dwyer. We 
again elected class officers, and for this, our 
Sophomore year, we elected Richard Robbins, 
President; Parker Prindle, Vice President; 
Phyllis Ryan, Secretary, and Paula Lienhard, 
Treasurer. In February, we held our first class 
dance, the Belles and Beaux Ball, which set the 
pattern for all the future dances of our and other 




classes, in that it was the first strictly dress- 
up class dance. With the coming of the Sopho- 
more year, came many new responsibilities. We 
were now upperclassmen, and we were expected 
to set an example for the incoming freshmen. 
Our representatives on the Student Council were 
Jackie Ashworth, Texann Hancock, and Peter 
McMahon.,,iJjj| 

When we became Juniors, we were already 
well acquainted with the new school and most 
of the teachers. Our class advisors were Miss 
Marshall and Mr. Mullarky. Our class officers 
were John Amaro, President; Parker Prindle, 
Vice President; Phyllis Ryan, Secretary; and 
Paula Lienhard, Treasurer. Mary Ross was 
appointed to fill Paula's unexpired term as 
Treasurer when Paula withdrew in the middle of 
the year. We held two dances in our Junior 
year— The Junior jump, and the Shillelagh Hop. 
Our Student Council representatives were Frank 
Hall, who was elected Vice President of 
Council, Phyllis Ryan, and Lynne Mingo. On 
May 17, 1957, the Junior and Senior classes 
jointly sponsored the Junior-Senior Prom, Blue 
Hawaii, which was held on Paradise Island, the 
name given to the gaily decorated gym, which 
indeed competed most successfully in decor and 
atmosphere with the most high-priced supper 
clubs. At the end of our Junior year, we were 
all saddened by the resignation of Mrs. Geary, 
who at one time had organized the Foreign 
Language Club. 




1 14 



msr 








Now, we were ready to start our Senior 
year and become subject to that age-old disease 
--senioritis. As class officers, we elected Will- 
iam Fay, President; Parker Prindle, Vice Presi- 
dent; Phyllis Ryan, Secretary (for her fourth 
consecutive year); and Mary Ross, Treasurer. 
Our class advisors were Miss Horner and Mr. 
Keady. Regretably, Miss Horner left in October, 
1957, to accept a position in Ldwrence High 
SchooL Appointed to fill her' position as class 
advisor was Miss Sharp, who had been our 
class advisor in our Sophomore year. 

In our Senior year, we held our last two 
dances, the Spooks and Ghouls Ball, and the 
April Showers Hop, another first--the first two- 
platoon dance in the history of the school. 
Two-platoon, you ask. Yes, two- platoon-- a 
dance from 2:30 to 5:GQ P. M. for the seventh 
and eighth graders, and a dance from 8:00 to 
11:00 P. M. for the ninth through twelfth grad- 
ers. 



wff 







Shangri-La, the Junior- Senior Prom for 
1958, was held in the Oriental Gardens, oniMay 
16th, in the gym decorated in true oriental 
style complete With hanging lanterns , wind 
chimes, fans, dragons, rickshaws, and all the 
other trappings necessary to transform our gym 
into a garden of unrivaled Chinese-Japanese 
splendor. Billy Fay and Jackie Ashworth reign- 
ed as king and aueen. ^dmmm 




Our Student Council representatives were 
Billy Johnston, elected as Council President; 
Dorothy MacDonald, Council Secretary; and Joe 
3arry, Council Treasurer. Bob Cornish and Phil 
Tupper completed our Senior representation on 
Council. 

The Senior Play, ''Curtain Call for Cliff- 
ord", was a tremendous success, both theatri- 
cally and financially, due to the efforts of Miss 
Sharp, the Play Director. Many new and bright 
stars shone on the dramatic horizons as a result 
of this play- 

One of the most important events of our 
senior year was the upsurge of school spirit. 
The football team broke a fifteen-game losing 
streak, ending the season with a five-win, three 
loss record. Perhaps the new stadium was the 
determining factor. The basketbal I team broke a 
thirty-six-league-game losing streak, with a six- 
win, six-loss league record. The baseball team 
which seemed to be the lone stand-out for wins 
in the past seasons did not fare so well this 
season. Theirs was a three-win, two-loss 

season. 

\ 



:■:-■'■' 



;,i.«" 



Now that we have graduated,, and are sen- 
iors nolonger, we would like to thank the teach- 
ers and the school for giving us a fine educa- 
tion and many pleasant memories to look back 
upon. 





115 









BOH 




CLASS PROPHECY 



Isn t progress 



wonderful! Just think, ten 



^fter hearing their enthusiastic descrip- 



years ago when I graduated from Wilmington tion, I was consumed with curiosity to see this 



High School, in 1958, Wilmington was only a 
small town. Now, as I stepped out of my car, I 
was amazed at the change that had taken place. 
No longer could Wilmington be called a small 
town. It was a fast-growing city. 

M 

The most impressive building in the new 
center was City Hall; and as I walked over to 
inspect it more closely, I recognized Mayor 
BILL FAY just coming out of his office. With 
him were JOSEPH GURSKI and BERT SELL, 
leading local politicians. They were engrossed 
in some important business, so 1 just slipped by 
them. On my way inside, I almost bumped into 
JIM COOMBS, the Tax Collector, who told me 
that he was on his way to speak with KEN 
ELLIOTT and LARRY TUCKER about the new 
tax assessments. ^fc^W^fe.| 

Passing on, ! looked into the Treasurer's 



new country club. I asked policeman, ANDY 
WHITE, for directions. His directions were far 
from explicit so I decided to take a taxi. Andy 
told me that, under the supervision of PETE 
McMAHON, road construction engineer, the 
roads had all been modified and improved so 
that I would not recognize them. Taxi-driver 
BOB WATERHOUSE drove up just then and I 
was off to the Country Club. This was my first 
view of the shopping center and I noticed that 
many new businesses had sprung up. We drove 
by GOULD'S DRESS SHOP. In the display win- 
dow, Madamoiselle JUDY was hanging up a sign 
announcing that many chic new fashions, creat- 
ed by NANCY MONTGOMERY, had just arrived. 
I asked Bob to stop for a minute so I could say 
"Hello". JOANNE ENOS and PAULA LIEN- 
HARD were there, selecting new outfits for the 
opening dance at the Country Club. 

00i 



office and there I saw City Treasurer MARY Remembering the waiting cab, I hurried out 



ROSS pouring over the books with JANICE 
SPANKS and PHYLLIS RYAN, her assistants. 
When I entered the office, I realized that the 
girls were not busy balancing the budget. In- 
stead, they were engaged in excited conversa- 
tion about the new Wilmington Country Club, 
which had just been completed unaer the super- 
vision of PAUL BUTT, noted construction en- 
gineer. They also informed me that the plans 
had been drawn up by JOHN KERR, celebrated 
architect. 



and off we went. As we passed ROBBIN'S DRUG 
STORE, ASHWORTH'S BEAUTY SALON, and 
GERRY GALVIN'S GAS STATION, I made a 
mental note to stop in on my return trip. 




116 



Passing Wilmington High School reminded 
me that several of my classmates were teaching 
there. JUDY BLANCHARD was teaching Eng- 
lish; FRANK HALL, history; GWEN FISHER, 
physical education teacher for the girls; and 
WILLIAM JOHNSTON, physical education in- 
structor for the boys. JOSEPH LANDRY was 
an art teacher, assistant to Mr. Ciano. Also at 
the school were MARY DRISCOLL, secretary to 
the principal, and school nurses, SANDRA DUP- 
RAS and JOANNE MclNNIS. 



Finally, we arrived at the Country Club 
The first thing that impressed me was the beau- 
tiful landscaping. I learned later that CLIFF- 
ORD KNIGHT, noted landscape artist, planned 
the whole course. As I walked inside, I noticed 
a number of people all moving in the same di- 
rection. My naturjjj|pCuriosity prompted me to 
follow the crowd and I soon found that it was 
the swimming p*>ol that had attracted them. 
RODNEY WATT seemed to be in charge in this 
area. I should have realized then that he was 
the swimming instructor. I saw DOROTHY 
MACDONALD, TEXANN HANCOCK, NANCY 
KELLEY, and LORRAINE Br|NNICK sitting 
together at the end of the pool. The years had 
not separated them. They were still the best of 
friends. I learned from them that there was to be 
an exhibition golf game in the afternoon, be- 
tween the National Amateur Golf Champion, 
PHIL TUPPER, and ROBERT CORNISH, a 
successful busi ness mffl^^%^|pS^%„. 

After leaving the pool, I went to the lobby 



and DERRICO'S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, and 

produced by TOM McANDREW. Later I learned 
that DICK GRAHAM was an afternoon Disc 
Jockey on that same television station. 

Servicemen GERRY CHRISTOPHER, JOHN 
DANIELS, GERRY MOSEY, WARREN NEW- 
HOUSE, and EDWARD SAWYER came in and 
told me that ED DeANGELIS and AL D'INDIA, 

also in the service, were coming later but had 
been delayed while practicing on the rifle 
range. I hope they have improved their aim since 



our high school days. 

Just then, HAROLD WHITE, a famous lec- 
turer, came in with his private secretary, VIR- 
GINIA DAWSON. Virginia asked me to stay for a 
Fashion Show, and told me that JOAN BEN- 
NETT, MARILYN BOYLE, and SONJA MYR- 
STED would be the models for the Show. Making 
my apologies, I told her that I had to be on my 
way. 

I took the bus at the corner and found that 
GERRY DUGGAN was the bus driver. Also on 
the bus were TOM BOWEN, RONNIE GIBBONS, 
JOE ROSELLI, and ROGER WHITE. I heard 
them say that they were working for AVCO and 
that JIM DAY had become Chief Engineer in 
charge of production. 

As I stepped off the bus, I met PHYLLIS 
DOUCETTE, who told me that she worked for 
the city newspaper as a reporter for the society 
page. Working with her were CAROL McKAY, 



dance at the Country Club. There would b& 
dancing to the music of BOB KASZYNSKI'S 
orchestra, and the master of ceremonies was to 
be JOSEPH BARRY. Looking more closely at 
the poster, I noticed that it was printed by the 
ROSS and SHELLEY PRINT SHOP. 

^ '■ I 1 

i i -r i • ■ .^Spfer* .$ \ ? 

In the lelevision Lounge,! sat watching 
the latest quiz program, "Be A Winner", and to 
my surprise, announcer DAN BURBINE was say- 
ing that NORINE KENDALL had just won an 
all-expense-paid trip to Bermuda. Lucky girl! 



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and glanced at a poster adve/ti sfng the opening Fashion Editor, and JOHN AMARO, Sports 

Editor. PARKER PRINDLE was the Editor-in- 
Chief. She also told me that WAYNE PRES- 
COTT has become President of the bank and 
that working in the bank with him was JOHN 
FENLON who had become a Certified Public 
Accountant. 

After my interesting day in Wilmington, 
I stepped back into my car, very sorry that I 
had to leave again. As I drove out of town, the 
last thing that I saw was the great new Star 
Market which LARRY FOLEY, as manager, has 
made the most popular in the community. 



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.117 







CLASS WILL 



We, the Class of 1958, of Wilmington High 
School, in the town of Wilmington, county of 
Middlesex, and state of Massachusetts, being of 
reasonably sound mind and body, but not so 
sound financially, do hereby make, publish, and 
declare this to be our last will and testament. 

First, we direct that all our just debts and ex- 
penses be fully paid and satisfied, as soon as 
conveniently may be, after our graduation. 

Second, we do give, devise, and bequeath to 
those we leave behind, the following: 

To the FACULTY - a long pause--for that sigh 
of relief that many of you will heave as you see 
the last of us as a class. No more will you be 
troubled by our inattention, careless work, or 
restless wandering. 

To the JUNIORS - regrets for the work undone, 
the money unmade, the opportunities allowed to 
stand bruising their knuckles—ignored, unheard, 
unappreciated, and unadmitted. 

To the SOPHOMORES - a fondness for money- 
making which we did not develop soon enough or 
strong enough to build up our weak, anemic, 
I ittle treasury. 

To the FRESHMEN - some affectionate advice- 
pay your dues, support your class, build up 
your treasury. 

JOHN AMARO leaves a booklet entitled "How 
to Catch a Flyball" to Daniel Bemis. 

JACQUELINE ASHWORTH leaves a broken 
alarm clock to anyone who likes to catch a few 
extra winks of sleep. 

JOSEPH BARRY leaves his "Patch-it-yourself 
Convertible Kit" to next year's fresh air fiends. 

JOAN BENNETT leaves to work eight hours a 
day, five days a week, fifty weeks a year. 

JUDITH BLANCHARD leaves her friendly per- 
sonality to Carol Randell. 

THOMAS BOWEN leaves 
Winston Fairfield. 

MARILYN BOYLE leaves a history book with 
almost all the answers in it to Pat Gatta. 

LORRAINE BRENNICK leaves a booklet en- 
titled "How to Sleep in History Class" to next 
year's seniors. 





DANIEL BURBINE leaves his unanswered ques- 
tion to next year's U. S. History class. 



PAUL BUTT leaves Number 14 to next year' 
football team, IF they can find it. 

GERALD CHRISTOPHER leaves to roll 
off the George Washington Bridge. 

JAMES COQMB£_leaves his continual smile to 
Ken Smith. 

ROBERT CORNISH leaves to make the world 
safe for democracy in the service. 

JOHN DANIELS leaves his elastics and a large 
supply of ammunition to Andrew Hammond. 

VIRGINIA DAWSON leaves--to be replaced by 
her si ster Marion. 

JAMES AUGUSTINE DAY leaves all his calls 
to the office to the other James Day. 



EDWARD DE ANGELIS leaves-finally. 






SALVATORE DE PASQUALE leaves to become 

the world's greatest pizza-maker. 

f 
I 

DONALD DERRICO leaves to make his fortune 

in one way or another. 

ALBERT D'INDIA leaves his Mickey Mouse 
membership card to Gus Sola. 

PHYLLIS DOUCETTE leaves her stilts to 
Joyce Arbo. 

MARY DRISCOLL leaves nothing-so she con be 
just a little bit different. 

GERALD DUGGAN leaves his bermuda shorts 
and dimpled knees to Warren Cormier. 



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SANDRA DUPRAS leaves her quiet ways to 
Carol Matthews. 




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KENNETH ELLIOTT leaves to have his picture 
taken for the yearbook. 

JOANNE ENOS leaves her many nicknames to 
next year's happy-go-lucky seniors. 

WILLIAM FAY leaves his school spirit to W.H.S. 

JOHN FENLON leaves his Wyatt Earp outfit to 
Don Weed, a real "drug- store" cowboy. 

GWEN FISHER leaves her ability to score to 
Judy Rossell i. 

LAWRENCE FOLEY leaves his little black book 
to Thomas Fuller. 




■ ERALD GALVIN leaves his motto, "Early to 
ted, early to rise, makes a man healthy, weat-* 
thy, and despi sed^^^^^^;^.^^^^:^^ . . 

^RONALD GtBBONS leaves soon after arriving. 



JUDITH GOULD leaves her neatness and ward- 
robe to Marie. 

RICHARD GRAHAM leaves his aches and pains 
to Gene C|>sfei 

JOSEPH GURSKI leaves his barbells to Frank 

Whitney. , 

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FRANK HALL leaves for the shows in Boston. 

TEXANN HANCOCK leaves her silence to Pat 
Gatta. £'/> i 

WILLIAM JOHNSTON leaves his tackle position 
to Ed Palirio,. 

FLORENCE JUSTICE leaves her crystal ball 
to the wfiter of next year's Class Prophecy. 

I'm 

ROBERT KASZYNSKI leaves to join Lawrence 
Welk's orchestra. 



NAh|CY KELLEY leaves to become a policewo- 
man.on DECOY. 

NOlflNE KENDALL leaves her shyness to some 
noi |y gal. 

JOHN KERR leaves to continue his lessons in 

bowlfig.' 

CLUMORD KNIGHT leaves his book closet to 

Lirftvobd Kemp.-' 
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J0SEPH LANDRY leaves his high-jump attempts 

teg the track team. ' 

VULA LIENHARD leaves her nickname of 
"Red" toSandra Higgtrts. 

)ROTHY MACDONALD leaves the office of 

tudent Council Secretary to any person who can 
in three places at once. 

■^■■•'O&Sl IS"'™?: 

HOMAS MC ANDREW leaves Driver Ed Jo those 
who think it is easy to learn how to drive correct- 

'y-Yl 

JOANNE MC tNNIS leovet to follow the Lady: 
with the Lamp-- Florence Nightirtgale. 



"VST*™ 
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PETER MC MAHON leaves abook entitled "Why 
I Couldn't Skip". 

NANCY MONTGOMERY leaves the title of "man 
-hater" behind her. 

GERALD MOSEY leaves to lead the re-rise of 
the Confederacy. 

SONJA MYRSTED leaves gracefully. 

WARREN NEWHOUSE leaves a desk full of 
worn out pencils and the knife he wore them out 
with. 

WAYNE PRESCOTT leaves a large supply of 
absence notes to anyone who needs them. 

PARKER PRINDLE leaves his many tasksto 
next year's "busiest senior". 'Ml 

. ■ : • «f*M;:A 

RICHARD ROBBINS leaves to start a chain of 
drug stores. 

JOSEPH ROSELLI leaves to become a stock 
car driver. 

MARY ROSS leaves 1001 excuses she received 
from seniors as to "why I can't pay my dues". 

WALTER ROSS leaves the freshmen this tfjpught 
--only 1095 days till their graduation. ii 1 

PHYLLIS RYAN leaves to be Johnny's private 
secretary. 

EDWARD SAWYER leaves his unfini shed plans 
for an atomic automobile to David O'Brien^ 

BERT SELL leaves the "Nor" off his narrVe. 

ROBERT SHELLEY leaves a bottle of eyewash. 

JANICE SPANKS leaves this old adage "Good 
things come in small packages". 

LAWRENCE TUCKER leaves this cruel school 
life to go out into the great, wide, wonderful 
world outside. 

PHILIP TUPPER leaves his basket 1: sk,i 
to Ernest Moegelin. 

ROBERT WATERHOUSE leaves, to^ become a 
thermostat inspector. 

RODNEY WATT leaves -- thankfully/ 

ANDREW WHITE leaves to see if al|he learned 
in Driver Ed really works. 

HAROLD WHITE leaves for Hollywood and a 
brilliant career in the movies. 

ROGER WHITE leaves last. 

In witness whereof, We, the Class) of 1958, the 
testator, have set our hand and seal hereto, 
fhis tenth day of June, in the year of Our Lord, 
one thousand nine hundred and fifty eight 
(1958). 

Robert Cornish 




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CAROL MC KAY leaves with sincere concern 
for the state she left Barnes, Bai ley and Jackson 
in. 



119 




CLASS ESSAY 

AN APPOINTMENT WITH DESTINY 



We - the graduating class of 1958 - are 
about to leave these halcyon days of youth. 
Before us stands we know not what. We are 
sure of one thing however - that in the world of 
tomorrow that is being planned today, we shall 
find our places. The deep tides of trouble that 
ebb and flow around the feet of free men every- 
where must be fought back even if at a grave 
price. The generations of tomorrow must not be 
subject to the dangers that face us today. This 
is, in a large part, our job, and we must carry 
it through to completion, else the world will not 
be safe for our descendants. 

With the development of atomic power, 
humanity stepped out upon a broad plain. It will 
be our task, as leaders of the free world, to 
guide mankind up into the bright highlands of 
peace and freedom. The weight of the world 
literally rests upon our shoulders. 

The life of tomorrow which promises so 
much for us and the rest of the world depends 
upon what we do now, and in the near future. 
The next twenty-five years will be crucial in 
that man will choose his future course - right 
or wrong - within that time. Will man continue 
to cringe under the shadow of an atomic specter, 
or will he, like Aladdin, rub the magic lamp of 
untold resources and cast light upon the age 
that waits for us? 

Man in his history has discovered a num- 
ber of eternal truths. Among these is that free 
and morally sound men when presented with a 
difficult problem rise to the occasion, arid, in 
the long run, choose the alternative that is to 
their credit. This decision is what we, in retro- 
spect, would have chosen. 



We must be honest to the age that is wait- 
ing, and, above all, honest with God. The age 
that waits will not tarry while we carefully 
weigh the balance of decision. We must put our 
faith in freedom and our way of life in every 
contact we make with the people of other coun- 
tries. 

Thus we have seen that the next twenty- 
five years are vital to the interest of freedom 
and the preservation of life as we know it. But 
what part will the people who graduate this 
year play? A number of this class will go on to 
higher education, and of the remainder, some 
will enter the service of our country defend- 
ing it, while others will enter business and take 
part in the vital commerce that keeps our coun- 
try strong. Four years from now those who went 
on to college will be ready to serve the nation 
and themselves in more specialized professions, 
perhaps as the scientists who will help in the 
start of the exploration of space, an event that 
will surely take place in our time. 

As we leave our days in high school we 
see that our duty is clear before us. We must 
learn to be good citizens of the United States, 
and, more importantly, good citizens of the 
world. We must learn all we can in order that we 
may help our country in the days of crises that 
lie ahead. We must remain faithful to those 
principles that have made our nation foremost 
in the world. We must retain an unshakeable 
faith in Almighty God. Lastly, and above all, 
we must all work towards that day in the dis- 
tant future that might be called our appointment 
with destiny. 

J. Parker Prindle 



120 



tULHIHGTOH MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



3 2136 00090 9477 



For Reference 

I 7 7 

Not to be taken from this room